Learn how YOU can help end sex trafficking

Puppet RGB
Police may be the first to spring to mind when thinking about who are on the front lines to help end sex trafficking. But most people no matter where you live or work can help end this devastating human rights violation.

Hotel Workers
Hotel staff can help identify potential victims and deter trafficking by keeping an eye out for guests who:

  • Have no luggage or ID;
  • Pay for rooms in cash; rent rooms for others; and/or use third-party reservations;
  • Repeatedly request access cards for different people;
  • Appear fearful, disoriented, or disheveled;
  • Show signs of physical abuse;
  • Are restricted from moving or communicating;
  • Are young and made to look significantly older;
  • Are young but have significantly older “boyfriends”;
  • Wait for periods of time in the lobby, talking on the phone;
  • Do not fit together;
  • Stay for short durations (20–60 minutes);
  • Continue to refuse housekeeping services;
  • Have multiple credit cards or excessive cash, and multiple computers, smartphones, tablets, and laptops;
  • Have excessive number of visitors, especially men;
  • Are men leaving alone and returning with young women; or
  • Have escort and massage ads in their rooms, and/or have excessive pornography or any child pornography.

Teachers
Among their students, teachers should look for students who:

  • Have frequent unexcused absences or an inability to attend class;
  • Have histories attending many different schools or recent multiple transfers;
  • Indicate meals, food, and money are limited or regulated, or they need to help family with money;
  • Have unreasonable work/chore expectations at home;
  • Travel frequently;
  • Use language such as “a train” or a “train party”;
  • Have overly controlling or abusive boyfriends;
  • Possess expensive items seeming out of character;
  • Have numerous inconsistencies when recounting life outside of school;
  • Show signs of physical abuse or neglect, drug or alcohol addiction, and/or high-risk or self-injurious behavior;
  • Resist or are emotionally triggered by touch;
  • Fall asleep in class and are usually fatigued;
  • Have tattoos or other “branding”;
  • Are overly shy about changing clothes or refuse to participate in physical education;
  • Demonstrate unusually fearful, anxious, depressed, or angry behavior;
  • Have familiarity with places selling commercial sex, such as Backpage.com;
  • Show signs of physical abuse, including bruises, cuts, broken teeth and bones, scars, and unattended infections; or
  • Seem to lack basic medical care for illness or injury.

Building Officials
License and code compliance officials have unique access to businesses and properties. While conducting inspections, they should keep an eye out for:

  • Darkened/obscured windows; locked doors requiring a person to be buzzed into doors to rooms locked from the outside;
  • Different men coming and going; all-male clientele;
  • Multiple credit cards and/or excessive cash;
  • Odd or late business hours;
  • Individuals with fearful responses, or an inability to make little or no eye contact;
  • A person with a tattoo or other “branding”;
  • A person who is watched, accompanied, or followed;
  • Potential victims all of same nationality or ethnic group;
  • People with bruises, injuries, or presence of blood;
  • Individual(s) not in possession of ID documents, restricted from moving or communicating, and/or unsure of their location (i.e., state, city); or
  • Young people made to look significantly older.

Suspect Something?
Take these steps if you are suspicious:

  • Call 9–1–1. No concern is too small;
  • Do not confront or intervene with traffickers;
  • Establish partnerships with police in your area;
  • If you come in contact with a victim, indicate that you are not the police;
  • Contact the National Human Trafficking Resource Center at 888–373–7888 for referrals to services or to report a tip;
  • Contact a Regional Navigator, if your in Minnesota. Regional Navigators are the main points of contact in Minnesota for sexually exploited youth and concerned    agencies. Find your area’s Regional Navigator by visiting Minnesota Department of Health’s website;
  • Establish protocols at your school, hotel, or office to be ready to respond if needed.

More information can be found on The Advocates for Human Rights’ website, including in The Advocates’ Sex Trafficking and Safe Harbor Resource Pack.

 

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