Updates – Supporting Victim/Survivors of Domestic Violence during the COVID-19 Pandemic

What’s New? The following article provides updates to our previous blog published March 26, 2020.

On April 30, 2020, Governor Walz issued Executive Order 20-48, which extended the Stay Home Order until May 18. The order is intended to continue to slow the spread of the virus, while allowing some people to return to work. In particular, this order allows retail businesses and non-critical businesses to resume operations with curbside pick-up.

In response to the Governor’s order, The Minnesota Supreme Court Chief Justice Lorie S. Gildea issued another order that extends the limited physical access to courthouses until May 18. Parties are encouraged to use virtual technology, when possible, to conduct hearings and all jury trials are suspended until at least June 1, 2020.

How does the new order affect victim/survivors of domestic violence?

Like previous orders, Minnesotans can leave their homes if they are unsafe, call 911 and/or seek and obtain emergency services. Victim/survivors can also file for a Harassment Restraining Order (HRO) or an Order for Protection (OFP). Judges will issue emergency orders if an imminent risk of physical harm exists.  A hearing may be scheduled if the judge determines that the emergency order creates a public or personal safety concern that must be addressed.

Domestic violence shelters remain open, and domestic violence advocates remain “critical sector workers,” under the Governor’s order. Shelter availability may be more limited due to more social-distancing within shelters. Call 1.866.223.1111 to find a shelter and services in your area.

How do I know if my hearing will be conducted remotely?

If you are a party to a case, the Court will contact you about the scheduling and manner of the hearing. You should contact either district court administration of the assigned judicial officer if you have received information yet.

Hennepin County District Court at (612) 348-6000 Ramsey County District Court at (651) 266-8266 Washington County District Court at (651) 430-6263 Stearns County District Court at (320) 656-3620

If you can wait up to 3 business days for a response, you may send an email. My hearing will be conducted remotely. How should I prepare?

The MN Judicial Branch advises all participants to follow these best practices for remote hearings that are held both with audio and video or else audio (telephone) only:

  • Find a quiet, well-lit place for clear and distraction-free audio and video. Turn off TVs, radios, and phone notifications. If there are others around you, try moving to a room with a door you can close.
  • If joining by video, find your device’s video camera and make sure it is uncovered. Position the camera at eye level so others can see you clearly.
  • If possible, make sure your device is plugged into a power source and not running only off battery power.
  • Dress in solid colors, and be mindful of what is behind you.
  • Use headphones, if possible, for the best sound quality and the fewest background noises.
  • Mute yourself when not speaking.
  • Identify yourself each time you speak.  The court reporter may not be able to identify individual speakers without identification.
  • Speak one at a time and pause before speaking in case there is audio or video lag.  Do not interrupt.  The court reporter can only take down one voice at a time.
  • Enter your first and last name when you join. If you are an attorney, identify which party you represent. For example, Joan Lawyer, Attorney for the Petitioner.

For more information, visit the MN Judicial Branch’s webpage on remote hearings.

Featured

Remaining the North Star During A Pandemic

The Advocates calls on the State of Minnesota to lead in supporting communities during the COVID-19 pandemic.  The Federal Government has provided crucial assistance to some families, but that legislation excludes many members of our communities.  For example, the Federal CARES Act restricts stimulus funds from many mixed-status families; unemployment benefits are not available for many self-employed or undocumented workers; and additional federal benefits have gaps, such as students who cannot file for themselves but also may not be counted as dependents by their families.  These gaps place individuals in vulnerable positions where they may be forced to remain in abusive or exploitative relationships or employment situations and mean that Minnesotans will become homeless due the pandemic, prolonging its consequences.  As a leader working to reduce violence against women and human trafficking, The Advocates knows all too well the multiplier effects economic vulnerabilities have on our communities.  Minnesota can only thrive if we are all thriving.  COVID-19 is a public health emergency that does not discriminate.  Therefore, our emergency funding and legislation must not discriminate either.   

Luckily, several important bills have been introduced that would ensure Minnesotans work together to get through this crisis together.  We call on our leaders in the Minnesota legislature to pass the following bills and continue to guarantee that we remain the North Star that promotes community.   

Please call or write your legislators and encourage them to support SF 4540/HF 4611 on Emergency Community Relief Grants and SF 4495/HF 4541 on Protection from Eviction and Foreclosure

SF 4540 and HF 4611, which would provide $50 million for emergency community relief grants that would allow eligible nonprofit organizations to make grants to individuals experiencing financial hardship as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak.  Individuals would be eligible for up to $1,500 if they are not eligible to receive other state or federal emergency relief.  These bills will support those who cannot receive unemployment benefits such as self-employed or non-citizen individuals; those who would not receive unemployment benefits at a rate that is commensurate with their earnings, such as tipped employees whose earnings do not accurately reflect income; and individuals such as adult dependents, minor or college-aged dependents, or others who were not required to file taxes for the past two years, and adults who are elderly or disabled but are not receiving Social Security benefits.  The grants would be specifically targeted to pay for food, emergency household items, rent support, utility bills, and other similar expenses

SF 4495 and HF 4541, which provide protection from eviction or foreclosure during a public health emergency, and which provide funding to help cover housing expenses due to COVID-19.  These bills not only protect homeowners or renters without status and mixed-status households, but also reduce risk of trafficking and other harms that might occur should someone be forced to either remain in dangerous situations/relationships to meet rent/mortgage payments or face homelessness where they are more likely to become victims of crimes. The bill also ensures security in the housing market by reducing foreclosures and maintaining homeownership by Minnesotans.  To be eligible for funding, applicants must: (1) have a public-health-related emergency; (2) have a specific housing-related payment due March 1, 2020, or later, that is past due; (3) be unable to pay the money owed because of the public health emergency; and (4) be a household, with a current gross income under 300 percent of the federal poverty guidelines at the time of application or as averaged over the previous 12 months, whichever is lower. 

By Lindsey Greising, Staff Attorney for The Advocates for Human Rights

The Advocates for Human Rights is a nonprofit organization dedicated to implementing international human rights standards to promote civil society and reinforce the rule of law. The Advocates represents more than 1000 asylum seekers, victims of trafficking, and immigrants in detention through a network of hundreds of pro bono legal professionals. 

Featured

A Global Look at COVID-19 and Domestic Violence

covid-19
Photo credit: CDC/ Alissa Eckert, MS; Dan Higgins, MAMS

The Advocates is taking action to respond to increased domestic violence during the COVID-19 pandemic. Visit our social media about the impact of COVID-19 on domestic violence in countries around the world. 

Across the world, agencies are seeing an uptick in domestic violence cases as stay-at-home and limited movement orders have been put in place in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Although some countries report a decrease in domestic violence calls to hotlines, advocates warn that this is more than likely due to victims/survivors being unable to safely make a phone call while living with their abuser. In response, hotlines around the world have implemented text and email hotline services that help victims be more discrete when attempting to access help.

Many shelters have been named “essential services,” especially in the United States, and this has allowed shelters to maintain operation of their in-person services, although these shelters are quickly becoming overcrowded. Advocates also warn that the pandemic may cause less people to seek these services due to the fear of contracting the virus. In addition, when victims are at home with their abusers, it may be more difficult for them to leave. It may also be more difficult to obtain legal services during this time, although many courts have moved proceedings online and have extended certain stipulations in order to protect victims and their children.

Although there have been efforts across the globe to address the increased risk that victims of domestic violence are now facing, gaps remain. Advocates around the world, as well governments and inter-governmental bodies like the United Nations, have led discussions on the alleviation of these barriers.

 Current state of affairs and principal concerns

Advocates around the world warn that shelter-at-home executive orders, sometimes called “safe at home” orders, will produce unintended and lethal consequences for domestic violence survivors, including:

  • Increased violence due to various aggravating factors, such as economic constraints, job loss, increased alcohol consumption and drug use, close proximity, children being at home
  • Pandemic-related abuse, such as:
    • Threatening to put victims on the street if they show symptoms
    • Making victims wash their hands until they bleed
    • Hiding essential items like hand sanitizer and soap from the victim
    • Threatening to cancel insurance
    • Circulating misinformation to victims to cause fear and deter them from leaving or seeking help;
  • Increased isolation from support systems, such as friends or family;
  • Travel restrictions that impact a victim’s escape or safety plan, or where it may not be safe for them to use public transportation or fly;
  • Decreased or eliminated access to safe havens like school, work, and community gatherings;
  • Difficulty accessing services, because of an:
    • Increased monitoring of phone activity by abusers
    • Inability to make hotline calls safely with abuser home
    • Decreased opportunities to escape
    • Decreased shelter space or shelters repurposed by the government to service COVID-19 patients
    • Fear of contracting the virus at shelters
    • Hotlines overwhelmed by increase in calls
    • Health systems that are overwhelmed by the pandemic, making it more difficult for survivors to access medical services, including therapy;
  • Increased anxiety and re-traumatization;
  • Homelessness;
  • Mental health consequences;
  • Decreased financial resources for victims to flee and support themselves due to job loss;
  • Decrease in family court approvals of requests for hearings;
  • Petitions not determined to be emergencies being dismissed or adjourned to a later date. These decisions may be made by someone in the court system screening electronically filed petitions, which could be life-or-death decisions for survivors;
  • Impacts on health workers, many of whom are women;
  • Reduced or limited access to vital sexual and reproductive health services, including for women subjected to violence.

What to do if you need help 

If you are in immediate danger in the U.S., call 911.

For help in Minnesota, call DayOne Hotline at 1-866-223-1111 or text 612-399-9995.

For help in the U.S., call the National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-SAFE(7233) or text LOVEIS to 22522. American Indians and Alaska Natives can also call the StrongHearts Native Helpline at 1-844-7NATIVE (762-8483).

What The Advocates is doing to strengthen protections for women

The Advocates is currently collaborating with Violence Free MinnesotaMNCASA, and Standpoint to gather information about the challenges faced by Minnesota’s justice system in responding to domestic violence and sexual assault.

The Advocates is conducting fact-finding with systems actors to provide ongoing analyses of the issues and new challenges that systems actors and courts face under the COVID-19 situation that it can provide to Violence Free Minnesota, MNCASA, and Standpoint as they develop real-time guidance to strengthen systems’ responses.

This week, The Advocates will begin posting daily with COVID-19 response information for countries around the world.  Follow @TheAdvocatesforHumanRights on social media (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and LinkedIn) for daily COVID-19 updates for countries around the world.

For more information on violence against women, visit our website StopVAW.org.